Sigourney Weaver talks about the future of the Avatar franchise

Watch: Sigourney Weaver talks about her return to the Avatar franchise

Sigourney Weaver has read the scripts for all five Avatar movies planned by director James Cameron, and she says viewers can expect “a huge story” as the epic franchise unfolds.

The 73-year-old star played hapless human scientist Dr Grace Augustine in Avatar, but returns this time around as Kiri – the adopted teenage daughter of Jake (Sam Worthington) and Neytiri (Zoe Saldana).

Weaver said that intriguing casting decision has been on the cards for more than a decade, starting with a meal she had with Cameron right after the first film’s success became apparent.

Read more: The set photo shows Sigourney Weaver in the water on the set of Avatar

She said: “We actually had lunch in 2010 and kind of talked about this character idea – a girl who was kind of related to Grace and maybe had her curiosity and her love of nature, who felt more comfortable in the forest than she did with people. She was a different girl. So I knew those basic things.

Weaver revealed that in the following years she received the scripts for Avatar: The Way of Water as well as the third, fourth and fifth films.

“What a huge story it is. I’m not saying I’m in all four, but I read all four,” she said.

Sigourney Weaver returns to the Avatar franchise to play the teenage character Na’vi Kiri in The Way of Water. (20th century workshops)

Approaching the role, Weaver said it was “very difficult” to decide where to pitch his performance as a character about five decades his junior.

“I didn’t want to impersonate a 14-year-old kid or do a ’14-year-old voice.’ So what I had to do was find my 14-year-old,” she said.

Read more: First rave reviews for Avatar: The Waterway

The star added: “I remember that time very well because I was so big when I was 11. So when I was 14 I just wanted to disappear half the time and half the time. time, I was outraged by something or other.

Avatar: The Way of Water introduces family for Jake and Neytiri as they face the renewed threat of humanity.  (20th century workshops)

Avatar: The Way of Water introduces family for Jake and Neytiri as they face the renewed threat of humanity. (20th century workshops)

“I think Jim encouraged me to improvise and do whatever I wanted. I would prep offstage and then let her go. I knew I had to get out of her way.”

Read more: Explaining the CGI innovations of Avatar: The Way of Water

Weaver said she felt “incredibly elated” to be able to take on such a profound acting challenge, an opportunity only available in the world of performance capture.

“I couldn’t be 14. John Wayne was never asked to be 14, but I got that opportunity with performance capture,” she said.

Sigourney Weaver says capturing performances has given her an opportunity that would have once been unthinkable.  (Wireframe)

Sigourney Weaver says capturing performances has given her an opportunity that would have once been unthinkable. (Wireframe)

Weaver added: “All the technology falls away and you’re just with these great actors, playing your dad and your mom and your siblings and even a whale-like creature.

“One way or another, the material ignites your imagination and becomes your world.

Read more: Sigourney Weaver reveals her favorite Alien movie

“In a way, I think it’s easier than making a movie with makeup, hair, clothes, sets and all that. I think it’s very freeing.”

Avatar: The Way of Water follows Jake and Neytiri as they flee their village when the “Sky People” return – led by Stephen Lang as a slightly different Quaritch – to take refuge with the water-loving Metkayina clan. .

Sigourney Weaver's new character is related to Grace from the first Avatar.  (20th century workshops)

Sigourney Weaver’s new character is connected to Grace from the first Avatar. (20th century workshops)

As for the future, producer Jon Landau explained that there are big plans for the rest of the franchise, should they be lucky enough to continue.

“We’ve laid out a roadmap of four films, each coming to its own story conclusion and emotional resolution, but together they form an even greater character saga,” he said.

Read more: Will the public experience the “Pandora withdrawal” again?

Landau added: “One of the things that history, and even the pandemic, has taught us is that you don’t know what the future holds.

“There are more stories to tell, and I hope global conditions allow us to tell all of those stories.”

Avatar: The Way of Water is in UK IMAX and in cinemas from December 16.

Watch the trailer for the sequel to Avatar, The Way of Water

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